Marjorie Kelly

Marjorie Kelly

Marjorie Kelly is a Senior Fellow and Executive Vice President at the Democracy Collaborative and an Associate Fellow at the Tellus Institute. She oversees a variety of research and consulting projects in inclusive economic development, employee ownership, and place-based impact investing, working with groups that include city economic development, foundations, and anchor institutions. She was co-founder and for twenty years president of Business Ethics magazine. She is co-founder of Corporation 20/20, a multi-stakeholder initiative to envision and advocate enterprise and financial designs that integrate social, environmental, and financial aims. Her latest book is Owning Our Future: The Emerging Ownership Revolution (2012). She attended Earlham College and the University of Missouri and holds a BA in English, cum laude, and an MA in journalism.

GTI Contributions
Marjorie Kelly
Commentary on The Struggle for Meaningful Work

February 2017











The Architecture of Enterprise: Redesigning Ownership for a Great Transition
The Architecture of Enterprise: Redesigning Ownership for a Great Transition

December 2012

A growing array of alternative ownership designs point to a fundamentally different kind of economy, where basic social architectures—the architectures of ownership—are designed to be life-supporting. This kind of economy may be more likely to create fair and just outcomes, to benefit the many rather than the few, and to enable an enduring human presence on a flourishing earth. Emerging ownership models represent the potential foundation for such an economy. They embody an emerging archetype that has yet to be recognized as a single phenomenon with a single name. This archetype provides an alternative to the dominant ownership archetype of today, which can be called “extractive,” for it aims at extracting maximum amounts of financial wealth. The emerging family of ownership designs can be called “generative,” for their aim is to generate the conditions for our common life to flourish.



Nuclear Power: Should It Have a Role?
Nuclear Power: Should It Have a Role?

June 2009

Adequate mitigation of the risks of climate change requires rapid displacement of fossil fuels with carbon-free energy sources. This imperative has prompted a growing chorus of energy analysts, policy makers, and industry advocates to press for a resurgence of nuclear energy. Even some environmentalists are urging reconsideration of the nuclear option, so long anathema to their own movement. Yet, with critical problems unsolved—safety and cost, waste storage, and nuclear weapons proliferation—nuclear power remains a deeply problematic response to the climate challenge, and to the wider challenge of global sustainability. Therefore, the transformative energy strategy of a Great Transition relies on three major prongs: renewable resources, deep efficiency, and a model of development based on environment-sparing consumption and production patterns.