• Is It Time to Postpone the 2020 Climate Summit?

    Monday, 30 March 2020
    In the Inter Press Service, Felix Dodds and Michael Strauss argued for postponing COP26 (formally, the 26th annual Conference of the Parties of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change), currently planned for Glasgow, Scotland, in November, but keeping up pressure on governments. They argue that the large-scale government response to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic can reshape the terms of debate about what is feasible, and the possibililty of a change in Washington in November would mean that a 2021 conference would be more fruitful.

  • Open Letter in Support of Emergency UBI

    Miki Kashtan

    Thursday, 19 March 2020
    URGENT: Open letter in support of Emergency UBI
    Dear All,
    As the enormity of the Covid-19 economic crisis begins to bite, tens of millions of people will shortly be unable to make ends meet. Emergency measures are necessary to support them.
    This open letter is being circulated amongst academics and public figures to call on governments to immediately enact an emergency basic income. Without it, we fear what will happen.
    Please sign and share, especially among networks of scholars and public figures. This is not a petition; like other public letters, its effect depends on who signs it, not how many.
    Please put your name, affiliation, and the country you live in. This matters because we aim to publish it in the press in multiple countries at once.
    Please have all signatures in by Wednesday 18th March.   
    In solidarity in these crazy times,
    x
    --
    Neil Howard

    Prize Fellow
    University of Bath

    Editor
    Beyond Trafficking and Slavery

  • What Is Health?: Allostasis and the Evolution of Human Design by Peter Sterling

    Wednesday, 26 February 2020
    What Is Health?: Allostasis and the Evolution of Human Design by Peter Sterling


    Medical education centers on the venerable “no-fault” concept of homeostasis, whereby local mechanisms impose constancy by correcting errors, and the brain serves mainly for emergencies. Yet, it turns out that most parameters are not constant; moreover, despite the importance of local mechanisms, the brain is definitely in charge. In this book, the eminent neuroscientist Peter Sterling describes a broader concept: allostasis (coined by Sterling and Joseph Eyer in the 1980s), whereby the brain anticipates needs and efficiently mobilizes supplies to prevent errors.

    Allostasis evolved early, Sterling explains, to optimize energy efficiency, relying heavily on brain circuits that deliver a brief reward for each positive surprise. Modern life so reduces the opportunities for surprise that we are driven to seek it in consumption: bigger burgers, more opioids, and innumerable activities that involve higher carbon emissions. The consequences include addiction, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and climate change. Sterling concludes that solutions must go beyond the merely technical to restore possibilities for daily small rewards and revivify the capacities for egalitarianism that were hard-wired into our nature.

    Sterling explains that allostasis offers what is not found in any medical textbook: principled definitions of health and disease: health as the capacity for adaptive variation and disease as shrinkage of that capacity. Sterling argues that since health is optimal responsiveness, many significant conditions are best treated at the system level.


  • Art, Science, and Diplomacy for a Plural World

    Laura Rival

    Friday, 17 January 2020

    ROUND TABLE WITH YANOMAMI SCHOLAR DAVI KOPENAWA:

    ART, SCIENCE AND DIPLOMACY FOR A PLURAL WORLD

    ON A CHALLENGED PLANET

    THURSDAY 6 FEBRUARY 2020

    12:00 – 13:30

    MFO AUDITORIUM

    The Round Table will take inspiration from Davi Kopenawa’s co-authored The Falling Sky to debate projects of ‘enlightened localisms’ that call for new ways of thinking about world civilization. Participants will address the central question: How do difference and equality make us more human?

    Very rarely do members of the part of humankind Jean Malaurie calls ‘les peuples racine’ (literally, ‘groups who have put roots down,’ that is, autochthonous peoples) have the opportunity to converse with literary critiques, political scientists, or particle physicists. Could a Yanomami creation myth inform the early universe cosmology of modern science? Would knowledge of supernovae and dark matter affect indigenous understandings of the cosmos? What could British diplomacy gain from shamanic diplomacy, and how could a shaman from the Amazon convince a western diplomat that ‘somos territorio’ (‘we are territory’)? At a time when the urgent moral claims of distinct and distant others are on the increase, what role could rooted cosmopolitanism play? And what is the significance of roots in a world where the rights of other-than-humans are being voiced? Can native Amazonian ontologies help with literary translations in an era defined by the climate emergency? Under what conditions could universal and particular criteria of beauty and perfection inform one another?

    SHORT INTELLECTUAL BIOGRAPHY

    Davi Kopenawa is an author, philosopher, spiritual leader, linguist, educator and spokesperson for the Yanomami people. He was awarded the United Nations Environment Program’s Global 500 prize in 1988 and received the Right Livelihood Award (also known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize”) in 2019. He belongs to the team of Yanomami researchers involved in the ceremonial dialogues project (PDDCY, Projeto de Documentação dos Diálogos Cerimoniais Yanomami). In 2013, he was invited to join the Faculty of Education at UFMG (Universidade Federal de Minas Geiras, Belo Horizonte, Brazil) as Visiting Lecturer. He also has academic connections with UFMG’s Department of Anthropology, CEDEPLAR (Centre for Development and Regional Planning in the Economics Faculty) and IEAT (Institute for Advanced Transdisciplinary Studies). His scholarly activities address a range of key decolonial interests, including: diversity and inclusivity; race and resistance; global Brazil; ecologies of knowledge and practice; imagining the divine; introducing diversity in university curricula.

    Davi’s collaboration of thirty years with Franco-Brazilian anthropologist Bruce Albert resulted in the 2010 publication of the acclaimed La Chute du Ciel. Paroles d’un Chaman Yanomami (Collection ‘Terre Humaine’ at Editions Plon). The book was translated into English and published by Harvard University Press in 2013. The two translators, Alison Dundy and Nicholas Elliott, won the 2013 French American Foundation Translation Prize in Non-Fiction (see Alison Dundy’s interview at www.frenchamerican.org/alison-dundy/). The book has been described as a textual duet. The two authors worked together as one, and came to inhabit the same ethnobiographic ‘I.’ In the narrative mosaic they created through empathy and lyrical depersonalisation, interculturality extinguishes the privileged position of seeing without being seen.

    Yanomami cosmology as articulated by Davi Kopenawa and the master shamans of Watoriki with whom he trained was a central inspiration for the exhibition Yanomami, Spirit of the Forest organised by the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain in Paris in 2003. It profoundly influenced the thinking of Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, a leading Brazilian anthropologist and philosopher whose theory of perspectivism has revolutionized cultural and post-colonial studies over the last twenty years. Kopenawa’s and Albert’s ethnographic achievement is an inspiration for all contemporary anthropologists.

    PARTICIPANTS

    [tbc. Leading Oxford scholars from English Literature, Modern Languages, Physics, International Relations, History, Anthropology, International Development, and the student body are currently being approached]

    ENDORSEMENTS

    Davi’s travels to Europe are facilitated by the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, which supports experiments in cross-cultural communication between artists and thinkers from different countries and backgrounds. The Foundation is currently organising the largest retrospective of works by Brazilian photographer Claudia Andujar (Paris, 30 January – 10 May 2020).

    The Round Table has received the support of the following organisations (tbc):

    ·         Bonavero Institute of Human Rights (Faculty of Law, Mansfield College)

    ·         LAC (Latin American Centre)

    ·         LSRI (Laudato Sí Research Institute, Campion Hall)

    ·         Linacre College

    ·         MFO (Maison Française d’Oxford)

    ·         ODID (Oxford Department of International Development)

    ·         OPHI (Oxford Poverty and human Development Initiative, ODID)

    ·         PRM (Pitt-Rivers Museum)

    ·         The Ruskin School of Art

    ·         SAME (School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography)

    ·         TORCH (The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities)


  • New Book Chapter on Redefining Freedom

    Aaron Karp

    Monday, 30 December 2019

    Aaron Karp recently wrote a chapter for the book Liberty and the Ecological Crisis: Freedom on a Finite Planet. His chapter, "Defending and Driving the Climate Movement by Redefining Freedom," explains why a cultural transformation away from consumerism is needed if we're to undertake a rapid renewable energy transition. It argues that climate activists must vocally champion a holistic definition of freedom that values democratic participation over unlimited consumption, and seeks balance between humans' relationship to one another and the natural world.

    It can be read on his website: https://freedomsurvival.org/defending-driving-climate-movement-redefining-freedom/.


  • New book due in April: Climate Justice & Community Renewal

    Brian Tokar

    Monday, 30 December 2019

    New book due in April: Climate Justice & Community Renewal

    Brian Tokar's new book Climate Justice & Community Renewal is available for discounted preorders during the holiday season and will be out in mid-April. Includes free shipping. https://www.routledge.com/Climate-Justice-and-Community-Renewal-Resistance-and-Grassroots-Solutions/Tokar-Gilbertson/p/book/9780367228491. There will be further discount offers through the year.


  • Global Tapestry of Alternatives

    Ashish Kothari

    Friday, 15 November 2019
    A new article by Ashish Kothari about the Global Tapestry of Alternatives, emerging from processes like the Vikalp Sangam in India and Crianza Mutua in Mexico, was published in Globalizations.

    Abstract: Globally there is a visible counter-trend to the destructive process of ‘development’ that the forces of capitalism, statism, patriarchy have imposed. Though still marginal and not yet able to make significant macro-level transformations, the resistance is growing. As is, often emerging from such resistance, there is a re-assertion of ways of life that respect, nature (including humans), co-existence, and justice. Such radical alternatives can be from ancient cultures, or be very new, but all have a core of ethical values that put life at the centre. One crucial barrier to these becoming a force for macro-level change is that they remain scattered, only sporadically learning from each other and becoming a greater critical mass. With this background, a Global Tapestry of Alternatives has been initiated in mid-2019, a kind of confluence of ideas and practices towards further collaboration and visioning. The idea has emerged from the Vikalp Sangam (Alternatives Confluence) process running since 2014 in India.


    Article link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14747731.2019.1670955?journalCode=rglo20

  • World Social Forum – Possible Perspectives

    Chico Whitaker

    Thursday, 14 November 2019

    Friends,

    Only in January this year I finished a long text at the request of Globalizations magazine, Finland, about the WSF future, with the title "Reflections: Brazil and the World Social Forum". I had started it in September 2018, when the tensions in the electoral campaign for the Presidency of the Republic in my country were at the highest level, with Lula arrested, and I could not ignore it. I decided then to present our situation and the sad results we all know as an introduction to the text I had to write about the WSF.

    Globalizations published this text now, retaining however only its second part, specifically on the WSF. I therefore send it to you as rapidly as possible, as several mailing lists had been launched on the WSF future, and I tried in my text to identify the genesis of the decisions of the first WSF Organization Committee, presented, after it, in the WSF Charter of Principles. This text could then be useful, as the reflection and articulations we wanted the WSF could facilitate became now even more necessary, given the current advances of the far right in the world and considering what is experienced today especially in Latin America.

    This second part of my text, with the title "Perspectives of the World Social Forum", can be read in English through the link: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/ETPT3PJAVUMNEMKB2DUM/full?target=10.1080/14747731.2019.1670957

    It is Portuguese in the blog  https://senospermitemsonhar.wordpress.com/2019/11/12/forum-social-mundial-perspectivas-possiveis-chico-whitaker/

    In this blog, I put also the first part of the text "Reflections: Brazil and World Social Forum", only in Portuguese, with the title "The experience lived in Brazil in 2018": https://senospermitemsonhar.wordpress.com/2019/11/12/i-a-experiencia-politica-vivida-no-brasil-em-2018-1a-parte-do-texto-reflexoes-brasil-e-forum-social-mundial-chico-whitaker/


  • Call for papers: The Great Transition International Conference

    Wednesday, 30 October 2019

    Call for papers

    The Great Transition International Conference
    May 21-24, Montreal

    The 2007-2008 financial crisis did not put an end to neoliberal policies, but it did lead to a large-scale rejection of neoliberalism as an economic model and a mode of thought. In the last decade, several new protest movements emerged: the Arab Spring, the Indignados, Occupy Wall Street, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, Fight for $15… These movements challenged the status quo, mobilized millions and alerted the world to crucial issues. They also won significant victories in some areas. Furthermore, new left-wing parties and openly socialist candidates entered the political arena with impressive results. However, we must concede that the tide hasn’t turned yet. There is no evidence that the balance of power is shifting to the left, or that the abolition of capitalism is near. In some places, the left is even losing ground to a rising far right.

    One of the deepest political lessons of our times is that the radical left is undergoing a crisis. We are currently unable to articulate a clear vision for the future. “Anti-capitalism”, anti-racism”, “Change the system, not the climate”, “Another world is possible”: this vocabulary expresses a negative and defensive political impulse, underlining our incapacity to put forward a positive, inspiring project. When we dare speak of revolution, it often evokes empty rehashing or, worse, the spectre of state violence committed in the name of so-called “communist” regimes.

    Therefore, our most urgent task is to rebuild an alternative to this racist, capitalist and patriarchal world. Social theories have given us critical tools to analyse the system, but have given us very few pointers on how to replace it. In some circles, interesting proposals have been made and bold social experiments have been tried, but these initiatives are either overlooked or isolated. They need to be connected, discussed and debated, so that a stronger movement emerges.

    To promote the convergence of various resistance movements into a powerful offensive, we must develop a genuine transition project based on the critical knowledges produced by scholars and activists. The Great Transition: Building Utopias international conference thus invites citizens and activists from all horizons to re-ignite our political imagination and to renew strategic debates along 6 main themes:

    1. An Economy in the Hands of Everyone
    2. Transforming our Relationship with Nature
    3. Anti-Imperialism in a Tempest-Tossed World
    4. Rethinking Democracy and Power
    5. Decolonizing Knowledge
    6. Fighting all Oppression

    Now is the time to act. The multi-faceted crisis we are going through requires the creation of new utopias. This is why The Great Transition invites you to submit panels and papers that will stimulate our reflections on alternative models and new political strategies in tune with our current situation. We particularly welcome papers from marginalized individuals and communities. Individual papers will be considered, but preference will be given to full panels. Note also that we encourage speakers to submit introductory panels and workshops aiming towards popular education. Please note that we strive towards gender parity. All-male panels may be rejected.

    The conference has three main objectives: (1) promoting alternatives to capitalism and to the many different systems of oppression, (2) equipping social movements and transformative initiatives by sharing experiences and knowledge, and (3) reinforcing ties between critical academics and militant organizations, as well as between francophone and anglophone networks.

     

    ***

     

    To submit a proposal or for more information, fill the form

    For questions, contact info@lagrandetransition.net

    (NB: Not affiliated with GTI, but still a great conference!)


  • Tom Athanasiou on a Global Green New Deal

    Tom Athanasiou

    Wednesday, 02 October 2019

    Tom Athanasiou has an article in The Nation, entitled Only a Global Green New Deal Can Save the Planet, in which he introduces the argument that a fair shares approach to international cooperation is essential to any even plausibly successful global climate transition. Specifically, the article proposes that a global Green New Deal can best be kickstarted through a proliferation of national green new deals that are structured, as per the plan from US presidential candidate and Vermont senator Bernie Sanders, to support international cooperation as well as domestic transformation.  The side effect, a very welcome one, would be the animation of the Paris Agreement and its not-yet-functioning ambition mechanisms, he argues.


  • Climate Futures II: Design Politics, Design Natures, Aesthetics and the Green New Deal

    Damian White

    Tuesday, 01 October 2019

    Climate Futures II: Design Politics, Design Natures, Aesthetics and the Green New Deal
    Thursday Dec 5th 2019
    Location: Metcalf Auditorium, Chace Center/RISD Museum
    The Rhode Island School of Design.  

     

    Tickets available here https://www.eventbrite.com/e/climate-futures-ii-design-politics-aesthetics-the-green-new-deal-tickets-74484064843 

    Over the last two years the Green New Deal has come to define how we might think about just post-carbon transition in the United States. Whilst denounced by some conservatives and liberal ecomodernists as implausible and dismissed by assorted climate doomsters as too little, too late, it still stands as the only game in town for thinking about post-carbon futures. This symposium seeks to shine a constructive, yet critical, light on not only the potentialities but also the limitations of the Green New Deal as a political, design, cultural, technological and aesthetic discourse and praxis.

    The Green New Deal has generated a rich series of policy debates about the ways in which just transitions could be stimulated and enacted. It has served as a reminder of the many admirable ways in which the old New Deal defined a vision of public works and public design, infrastructure and planning for the public good. However - and as many Green New Dealers are well aware - the original New Deal was also marked by multiple exclusions and a complicated racial, gender and labor politics. It worked with a political imaginary largely bounded by the US nation state. Its more radical ambitions were ultimately constrained and contained. A Green New Deal will have to mobilize against fossil capitalism, coloniality and an emboldened White supremacy in very different ways to the old New Deal. It will have to address a global climate emergency that will require building new forms of solidarity across borders and boundaries. It will also have to open up discussions about the socio-technical and political design pathways to post-carbon futures in ways that might force us to move beyond the aesthetic and design horizons of “small is beautiful” era environmentalisms without tumbling back into a paternalistic liberalism.
     
    If the policy context that could inform a Green New Deal is slowly coming into view, the cultural, aesthetic, socio-technological or design politics that could further support and radicalize a new Green New Deal is less in evidence. This could stand as a significant limitation to further progress given that we know that just transitions to post-carbon futures are not going to emerge though legislation alone nor will they be built through fear of extinction or declarations of the need for eco-austerity. Diverse publics will have to be mobilized at affective, cultural and political levels. A sense of political and creative agency, desire and perhaps even joy in the opportunities that exist for democratically designing and redesigning our worlds will all be vital for enacting just post-carbon futures. The just transition, understood as the Green New Deal or otherwise, will have to be imagined and built, fabricated and realized, coded and created. Politicized processes of making, of prefiguring, that occur again and again and again are going to be constitutive features of the attempt to build survivable futures on a rapidly warming planet. New forms of art and cultural production, new modes of solidarity and care, a new design politics residing in new public institutions residing in many democratic spaces will be required to disarm the fatalists and the fanatics. This symposium seeks to consider how a Green New Deal might help us face down the climate doomsters and denialists, think beyond technocrats and technophobes and build creative political ecologies for the future.  

    Coffee 8.30am-9am 
    Introductions 9.00am-9.20am

    9.00am-9.05am “Welcome to the Symposium/Welcome to Nature-Culture-Sustainability Studies at RISD” Jonathan Highfield GPD Nature-Culture-Sustainability Studies at RISD.

    9.05am-9.15am. “Climate Futures, Design Politics and the Green New Deal: Some Introductions” Damian White, Dean of Liberal Arts, RISD.

    9.15am-10.30am

    1. Architectural futures, public infrastructure+ the Green New Deal
     
    The architectures have, to date, been somewhat inconsistent champions of just transitions for low carbon futures. Sustainable design, with its rather one-sided focus on deriving “lessons from nature”, has historically displayed limited interest in class, race, labor, gender, or broader power relations. Design schools and design professionals have regularly proclaimed that they can play a leadership role in building low carbon futures but then continually returned to “business as usual agendas”. The call for a Green New Deal, though, has raised hopes that more radicalized visions of architecture, landscape architecture and interior architecture could be renewed, revitalized and reworked in more sophisticated ways. In this panel we will consider the extent to which new forms of public works for the public good in sustainable urbanism, green infrastructure and adaptive reuse could push back against green gentrification and green neo-liberalism. We will explore the ways in which labor struggles for just working conditions within architecture and design could ally and reinforce the call for a Green New Deal. We consider how architectural innovations with virtual reality could open up community engagements with sea level rise. Finally, we struggle with the extent to which the national imaginary of a Green New Deal can address the profound cross-border impacts and global design challenges posed by climate change.

    Chair: Ijlal Muzaffar (RISD THAD/Global Arts and Culture Graduate Program Director)

    • Billy Fleming (Ian L. McHarg Center, UPenn). “Landscape Architecture and the Green New Deal.”
      • Peggy Deamer (Yale/The Architecture Lobby); “Labor, Architecture and the Green New Deal.”
      • Daniel Barber (Architecture, UPenn). “After Comfort.”
      • Liliane Wong (Interior Architecture, RISD) “INTAR, VR and Rising Sea levels.”

     

    Discussant Amy Kulper (Architecture, RISD). 

    Sponsored by the Division of Liberal Arts

    10.30am-10.45am Coffee

    10.45am-11.50am

    2. Dialogue Session: Racial Capitalism, designs for energy transition and the Green New Deal 

    Industrialized energy has long been predicated on a system of racial capitalism and colonialism. We rely on electricity, heat, and fuels that derive value through the historical and ongoing displacement and exploitation of indigenous, black, and Latinx land, labor and life. The Green New Deal could offer an opportunity to not only overhaul this existing fossil fuel infrastructure but also redress the racial capitalism on which it is built. In this dialogue, we will explore some of the tensions that currently exist between the urgent need to move as fast as possible to implement a clean energy transition and concerns that, if this transition is not done right, it could recreate new environmental injustices and new sacrifice zones. We will consider the ways in which environmental justice movements are productively contributing to new decolonial visions of energy transition. Finally, we will explore the opportunities that exist for confronting and dismantling racial capitalism through a Green New Deal framework, focusing on policies, strategies, and overarching principles.

    Chair: Lauren Richter (HPSS/NCSS RISD)

    Discussants: Myles Lennon (Anthropology, Brown), Shalanda H.Baker (Law, Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University) and Jacqui Patterson, (Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program). 

    Sponsored by RISD’s Office of Social Equity and Inclusion


    11.50am-12.00am Break

    12.00am-1.10pm

    3: Liberatory ecotechnologies, cyborg ecologies and the Green New Deal

    In the 1960s, Murray Bookchin argued that a post-capitalist ecological society would have to incorporate automation plus liberatory eco-technologies to provide the infrastructure of a new ecological society. Eco-design and eco-technology running alongside much broader forms of social change could not only reawaken humanity’s sense of dependence on the environment but restore selfhood and competence to a “client citizenry.” Contemporary debates on the socio-technical infrastructure that could underpin survivable futures have become increasingly anxious, ill-tempered and polemical. Whether we consider debates around 100% renewables or 100% clean, lab meat or the future of agriculture, either/or logics would seem to run through the ever sharper exchanges between de-growthers and ecomodernists. A worsening climate crisis is clearly exacerbating the stakes of the discussion and acting as a ratchet forcing reframings of our understanding of acceptable and unacceptable technologies. In this session we explore what exactly it might mean to advocate for liberatory technologies, design justice and a progressive technological politics in an age of climate chaos and cyborg ecologies.

    • Kai Bosworth (School of World Affairs, VCU) “Out of the woods: liberatory technologies revisited”.

    • Sasha Costanza-Chock (Civic Media, MIT) “Design Justice for the Green New Deal.” 
      • Holly Jean Buck (Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, UCLA) “Why we need to think in progressive utopian ways about carbon removal technologies.” 
      • Sophie Lewis “Aminotechnics.”

      1.10pm-2.20pm :LUNCH

      2.20pm- 3.30pm

      4: Liberatory aesthetics for a just transition?

      Building survivable futures on a warming planet is not simply going to involve policy for a Green New Deal. Just transitions to post-carbon just futures are inevitably going to raise very significant aesthetic, political and cultural issues about the worlds that we are leaving behind and the world that we need to design and make. The Green New Deal or the just transition more broadly has developed little in the way of a new aesthetic or cultural politics. Its primary co-ordinates have been to look back to the political and public aesthetics that emerged around the first New Deal of the 1930s or turn to the aesthetic that emerged out of predominantly white US environmentalisms of the 1970s. Do we need to find other ways to “stay with the trouble” to paraphrase Donna Haraway as we try and construct survivable futures? What might a joyful, aesthetics of a just transition look like that can come to terms with the loss of certain kinds of nature-cultures, modes of valuing and modes of making and be open to the challenge of designing new cosmopolitan nature-cultures, new ways of valuing and new modes of future making? Can we envisage an aesthetic and cultural politics that reclaims low carbon pleasures present in everyday life? Does a progressive cultural politics for a just transition require a broader decentering of Eurocentric or US centric environmental aesthetics and a more sustained engagement with the insights of decolonial, Latinx, post humanist, cosmopolitical and other currents? In this panel we ponder the kinds of  liberatory aesthetics and cultural politics that could underpin the just transition and offer solidarity and hope across borders and boundaries.

      Chair: Paula Gaetano Adi (RISD, Experimental and Foundation Studies)

      • Yuriko Saito (Nature, Culture, Sustainability Studies/HPSS RISD) “Environmental Aesthetics and Everyday Life." 
      • Anathastia Raina (Graphic Design, RISD) “Cyborg Ecology for the Green New Deal.”
      • Priscilla Ybarra (English, University of North Texas) “Latinx Environmentalisms: Place, Justice, and the Decolonial.”

     

    Discussant: Nicholas Pevzner (Landscape Architecture, U,Penn). 


    Sponsored by RISD’s Experimental and Foundation Studies and RISD Graduate Program in Global Arts and Culture


    3.30pm -3.45pm Coffee

    3.45pm –5pm

    5. Thinking beyond the ecology of panic: The political opportunity of the Green New Deal.

    The prospect that climate conditions may have reached a point of no return has now become a reoccurring motif of assorted climate doomsters who seem to delight in telling working and marginalized people that “their goose is cooked.” This is a politics that the Green New Deal clearly has to face down. An ecology of panic at best is going to feed “passive nihilism” (Connolly, 2016) and “melancholic paralysis” (Wark, 2015) but in addition it could feed the rise of eco-fascism and eco-apartheid. In this concluding session, we consider the extent to which a politics of a Green New Deal framed around the need for environmentally just investment and infrastructure, a fundamental reworking of class, race and gender relations, new modes of democratic  planning  and approaches to global politics focused on a new internationalism and solidarity across borders could open up very different paths. 

    Timmons Roberts Chair (Brown)

    • Alyssa Battistoni  (Harvard College) “Cyborg Ecosocialism + Gendered Labor + the Green New Deal.” 
    • Kian Goh (Urban Planning, UCLA) “Urban Planning + Design for a Green New Deal.”
    • Dan Traficonte (Urban Studies + Planning, MIT)  “An Innovation Policy for the Green New Deal.” 
    • Thea Riofrancos (Political Science, Providence College) “A Globally Just Green New Deal”.

     

    Discussant: Camilo Viveiros, George Wiley Center 

     

    Sponsored by The William R. Rhodes Center for International Economics and Finance, Brown University and The Institute at Brown for Environment and Society 


  • Call for Papers: Environmental Governance: Policy Discourse, Deliberative Practices, and Public Participation

    Frank Fischer

    Tuesday, 03 September 2019
    Courtesy of Frank Fischer:

    This conference focuses on the interplay among policy discourses, deliberative practices, public participation and environmental governance. It examines how policy publics, politicians, citizens and other communities, can influence governmental decisions, and vice versa. In particular, it focuses on these interactions in the context of the uncertainties that have been created by the rise of populism and the apparent irrationalities across different governance regimes, including the phenomenon of post-truth politics.  

    The conference seeks to draw attention to the various environmental crises, especially those related to climate change–the challenge of this century. Granted that strong responses from ordinary citizens are required, including environmental movements, effective environmental governance also depends on knowledge and expertise. However, these processes are not only fraught with scientific and policy uncertainties, they take place within a turbulent political environment, including its multiple confrontations with politics of climate denial and post-truth. It is therefore not surprising that both the problems and their sustainable solutions are often wicked and messy.  

    Topics explored in this conference include: environmental governance, public discourse deliberation, communications, public participation, public behaviour (e.g., blame, resilience, tolerance, robustness), and narratives (e.g. issues of information asymmetries). We also welcome papers that critically examine the extent to which the climate of “alternative facts” and post-truth politics has influenced policy-making.This conference is broadly framed and welcomes all papers from a wide range of disciplines. Comparative papers are especially welcome. A summary of topics of interest in this conference is as follows:

    1. Environmental governance (including climate change)
    2. Environmental sustainability discourses
    3. Environmental knowledge and expertise
    4. Post-truth and alternative facts
    5. Citizen and public participation
    6. Public narratives and policy argumentation
    7. Policy design and deliberative practices
    8. Political apathy and blame avoidance

    The conference, comprising two days of paper presentations (Jan 29-30, 2020), will be followed by a discussion (on the morning of Jan 31) on conference findings and contributions by Critical Policy Studies.    

    Paper proposal submissions are to be made to iwp_admin@nus.edu.sg by October 31, 2019. The submission must include a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words, as well as the full name, institutional affiliation, and email of all authors. Please also indicate the topic(s) of interest (e.g., “#5. Citizen and public participation”) that the paper aims to cover. The submission can also include new topics not enumerated above.   Only successful applicants will be contacted by late November 2019.

    Successful applicants also need to submit a draft paper of between 5,000 and 8,000 words by January 17, 2020. *Only previously unpublished papers or those not already committed elsewhere can be accepted.  

    This conference is supported by Institute of Water Policy, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore. It is organized in association with the Critical Policy Studies journal. For additional information contact Leong Ching, NUS, and Frank Fischer, Critical Policy Studies

  • A World Parliament: Governance and Democracy in the 21st Century

    Andreas Bummel

    Tuesday, 27 August 2019

    Global challenges such as war, climate change, poverty and inequality are overwhelming nation-states and today’s international institutions. Doing the right thing requires more than having the right policies; it requires having the right political structures to implement them. Achieving a peaceful, just and sustainable world civilization requires an evolutionary leap forward towards a federal global government. The creation of a democratic world parliament is the centerpiece of this project.

    This book describes the history, today’s relevance and future implementation of this monumental idea.

    The book can be ordered in retail and online bookstores worldwide. Available as e-book, paperback and hardcover edition.

    Read about the book’s presentation in New York, Brussels and Stockholm.

    Join the conversation at Twitter. Hashtag: #worldparliament.


  • South Asian People's Action on Climate Change

    Sajai Jose

    Wednesday, 21 August 2019

    Introduction

    Since the industrial revolution began, human society has emitted a massive amount of CO2 into the atmosphere, raising its concentrations to an unprecedented 415 ppm today that is 50% over pre-industrial times. This has destabilized our climate and already caused an average global temperature rise of a little over 1°C. The consequences are rapid glacier melt, rising sea levels, acidifying oceans, greater monsoon unpredictability, more extreme weather events such as heat waves and heavy rainfall, which have posed a grave threat to both the natural world and to human society.

    The acceleration in the rate of change of climate change impacts today is worrisome—Himalayan glaciers are melting twice as fast as they did 25 years ago, sea level rise is 50% more than earlier, cyclone intensity has increased, insect populations are dwindling rapidly, and droughts and extreme weather events have become more frequent.

    Despite the 2015 inter-governmental Paris Agreement, CO2 emissions are still rising; and at current emission rates, we will cross the 1.5-2oC do-not-cross temperature rise redline in a few decades. Climate change has put the earth’s environment and human society at the risk of drastic and permanent damage. Without immediate and deep emission cuts, temperature rise by 2100 may be 3-4oC over pre-industrial times, and possibly more if inherent tipping points are crossed. In other words, the average temperature in future may be nearly as high as what meteorological departments currently classify as heat waves.

    South Asia is one of the most vulnerable areas in the world to climate change impacts. Barring Bhutan and Sri Lanka, all other South Asian nations are at very high risk to climate change. By 2100, Pakistan will be extremely water stressed, the Maldives will drown, a quarter of Bangladesh will be under the sea, causing tens of millions of climate refugees, Nepal will face unprecedented floods from melting glaciers, and parts of India will reel under floods while other parts will face continuous drought.

    The UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres’s has described the current situation as “an emergency we face, and that unless we make a course change by 2020, we face the possibility of a runaway climate change with disastrous consequences.” The United Kingdom and Ireland have recently declared a climate emergency, as have many cities in Canada, Australia, USA, New Zealand, Switzerland, Austria, Spain and Belgium. Climate emergency declarations cover 100 million people today, but how these official declarations will translate into climate change mitigation action is yet unclear.

    SAPACC

    The South Asian People’s Action on Climate Crisis (SAPACC), a rainbow coalition of organizations and individuals, was formed in May 2019 to bring together youth, women, farmers, workers, fisher folk, scientists, and people of all walks of life who are concerned with the impacts of climate change. SAPACC intends to appeal to South Asian governments to make declarations and follow them with appropriate actions to mitigate the climate crisis, and to table resolutions in the United Nations for taking urgent action at the global level. SAPACC will also work with South Asian civil societies to take urgent measures to reduce the risk of climate change impacts.

    Objectives

    *Create a platform for civil society action to mitigate climate change impacts on a crisis basis
    *Share information on climate change impacts and mitigation programmes
    *Raise public awareness regarding climate change impacts and mobilize public action to mitigate it
    *Based on climate science and mass action, influence public policy on climate change in South Asia

    Core demands

    Sustainability: Emissions of developed nations must become net zero (CO2 emissions must equal sequestration) by 2030, and of developing nations by 2040. Gross global consumption should be reduced to sustainable levels.

    Equity: The ratio of maximum to minimum income or energy consumption for all people in the world should not exceed 2.

    Decentralization, democratic, transparent governance:
    Governance should be decentralized and democratic; all governance information should be in public domain.

    Environmental restoration: Degraded land, water, air, and to the extent possible, biodiversity should be restored to their pre-industrial period quality.

    Responsibility for loss & damage:
    All nations/regions should take responsibility for the impacts of climate change —displacement, property loss, environmental damage, etc—in proportion to their historic emissions (emissions from 1800-to date).

    South Asian Launch Meeting

    SAPACC will hold a South Asian Launch Meeting of civil society organizations and individuals from all over South Asia in Hyderabad, 18-21 September 2019. Several South Asian organizations will be co-organizers of the Launch meeting.

    Agenda

    Sept 18: 8 parallel tracks on climate change and its impacts, Inaugural public meeting
    Sept 19: Country reports, Core demands
    Sept 20: Future programmes, Resolutions
    Sept 21: Organization, Conclusions

    Participants

    Youth, women, farmers, workers, fisher folk, scientists, and lay people worried about how climate change will impact them, their children and their livelihoods, and who wish to act collectively to mitigate it. About 200-250 delegates are expected to participate in the launch meeting; 30-35% of them will be from countries other than India. The Inaugural function on 18 September will be attended by 1,200 persons, including trade union workers and children who have gone on strike against climate change.

    Volunteers

    Volunteers for organizing the Launch Meeting may write to SAPACC’s Convener or Co-conveners.

    Funding

    The Launch Meeting will be entirely crowd funded by small donations from sympathetic organizations and individuals, and will be in Indian rupees only. Potential donors may write to SAPACC’s Convener or Co-conveners for any query or for instruction on how to make a donation for the Launch Meeting.

    Co-organizers

    19 organizations, including environmental organizations, trade unions, tribal organizations, farmer’s organizations, civil rights organizations from India and Sri Lanka are co-organizers of this event. More South Asian organizations are expected to become co-organizers.

    Registration

    To download the registration form (MS Word document), click here

    Contact

    SAPACC, 2-107/4, Sree Ramnagar Colony, Gangaram, Seri Lingampally, Hyderabad TS 500 050. India

    Website: https://www.sa-pacc.org   Email: sapacc2019@gmail.com

    Sudarshan Rao Sarde, Convener Tel: +91 88268 60844 email: sraosarde@gmail.com
    Sagar Dhara, Co-Convener Tel: +91 94404 01421 email: sagdhara@gmail.com
    Soumya Dutta, Co-convener Tel: +91 92137 63756 email: soumyadutta.delhi@gmail.com

     


  • "The Last Op-Ed"

    Doug Schuler

    Tuesday, 20 August 2019

    Doug Schuler has a new op-ed, The Last Op-Ed: We Are Destroying the One Thing That Could Save Us, on the Common Dreams web site (https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/06/19/we-are-destroying-one-thing-could-save-us-civic-intelligence). In it, he argues for the importance of civic intelligence to the interlocking challenges we face.

    A Spanish translation is also available here: https://elsemanario.com/colaboradores/miguel-angel-perez-alvarez/318124/destruimos-lo-unico-que-nos-salvaria-inteligencia-civica/

  • New Study on Oregon's Climate Leadership

    Monday, 01 July 2019
    Halina Brown and Maurie Cohen authored a new study on Oregon's climate leadership, entitled "Climate-governance entrepreneurship, higher-order learning, and sustainable consumption: the case of the state of Oregon, United States," published in the journal Climate Policy. You can read the article here.

    Abstract:
    The ongoing devolution of climate policy-making to sub-national levels has prompted growing interest in policy entrepreneurship by individuals who are politically and technically creative and institutionally resourceful. This paper investigates the case of the materials-management programme in the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality which has emerged as a national and international leader by focusing on the role of household consumption in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Two noteworthy innovations involve the development of a consumption-based GHG emissions inventory and introduction of policies aimed at facilitating construction of small homes (so-called Accessory Dwelling Units, ADU). The case traces over several decades the higher order learning processes within the group and their entrepreneurship toward affecting broader changes in emission accounting and climate policies in Oregon. The paper identifies the enabling factors for these innovations, and considers: how to create the conditions for learning, experimentation, and policy entrepreneurship; how to reproduce these conditions in different locales; and how to recognize and foster innovations that arise outside the established mainstream ‘climate community’. It also stresses the benefits of breaking down the barriers between science-based analysis and policy. The two questions frequently raised in the climate policy debate – how to bring researchers and practitioners together to develop efficacious policies; and how to replicate successful programmes and policies across different communities, jurisdictions, and locations – should be re-examined. It may be more appropriate to ask instead: How to create conditions for learning, experimentation, and policy entrepreneurship; and how to reproduce these conditions in different locales.

  • 33rd Dignity Conference in the Amazon of Brazil

    Wednesday, 07 August 2019
    Dear Friends and Colleagues!

    We would like to welcome you to the 33rd Dignity Conference in the Amazon of Brazil:
    29th August – 2nd September 2019 in Marabá, state of Pará State
    3rd September – 5th September 2019 in Belém, capital of the state of Pará

    The title of the conference is Cultivating “Good Living Amazon”:  Nurturing Solidarity with Mother Earth.

    We thank Manoela Souza and Dan Baron, the directors of the Transformance Institute Culture & Education, and its AfroRaiz Youth Collective of the Community University of the Rivers in Marabá so much for hosting this conference, and we thank Gabriela Saab from São Paulo for co-convening it. Gaby is specialist in Human Rights Law and Environmental Law (USP) specialist and in the Right to Water as a Human Right.

    You receive this email because the Amazon needs our support now! As you may be aware, the social and environmental situation is more serious than ever. Therefore, we would like to draw your attention to this conference. The local scholars and activists need to feel that they are not forgotten. They need you!!!

    See, for example, 'What now, Brazil? Facing absurdity and injustice, the left must react', by Boaventura De Sousa Santos, Wall Street International Magazine, 29th July 2019,
    https://wsimag.com/economy-and-politics/56371-what-now-brazil

    This year, the conference will take the format of an Eco-Pedagogic Caravan, developed since 2011 by our hosts. We will visit two communities at risk where alternative Good Amazon Living projects are emerging, and we will visit key places of violation and humiliation. In this way, local, national and international participants will better understand how to cultivate a Good Living Amazon and how to support people healing themselves from the humiliation they have suffered.

    We would like to invite you to participate in the conference in two ways:

    1) It would be wonderful if you could come personally to the conference and exchange knowledge with other participants and local communities leaders. There are no registration fees, participation is free. Everyone is kindly invited to care for their travel and housing costs themselves.

    2) If you cannot be with us in person, we would be very glad if you could join our temporary WhatsApp group that we will make for this conference. There you will be able to be part of the Amazon Conference and have a taste of our main activities, and perhaps you could send the
    participants a message, a video or a photo of support! Please send a message to Gabriela Saab to +5511993015509).

    Please find attached your invitation letters and the program in English and Portuguese. Thank you very much for kindly forwarding this to like-minded people!

    Please enjoy also our last Dignity Letter at https://conta.cc/2N787fY.

    The full program of the conference will evolve here:
    www.humiliationstudies.org/whoweare/annualmeeting/33.php.

    Please know that you are invited to spend the entire conference with us, so that true dignity-family-building can emerge. All our events are part of an ongoing effort to nurture a global dignity community.

    We so much look forward to having you with us in another future-oriented paradigm-changing conference, where we will practice and manifest the dignity that we, as humankind, are in need of if we wish to offer our children a decent future on our beautiful but finite Blue Planet!

    A LOVING WELCOME TO YOU!
    from Evelin Lindner and Gaby Saab, soon on their way to the Amazon
    also on behalf of Dan and Mano
    and on behalf of Linda Hartling and Michael Britton
    and on behalf of our entire global dignity movement!

  • Stakeholder Democracy: Represented Democracy in a Time of Fear

    Friday, 05 July 2019
    Felix Dodds's new book Stakeholder Democracy: Represented Democracy in a Time of Fear was released by Routledge.

    Description: In the context of sustainable development, this book describes how we are moving from representative to participatory democracy, and how we are now in a "stakeholder democracy," which is working to strengthen represented democracy in a time of fear.

    Since the 1992 Rio Earth Summit the idea of stakeholder democracy has grown, with stakeholders engaged in helping governments and intergovernmental bodies make better decisions, and in helping them to deliver those decisions in partnerships amongst various stakeholders, with and without government. Seen through a multi-stakeholder, sector and level lens, this book describes the history of the development of stakeholder democracy, particularly in the area of sustainable development. The authors draw on more than twenty-five years of experience to review, learn from and make recommendations on how best to engage stakeholders in policy development. The book illustrates successful practical examples of multi-stakeholder partnerships (MSPs) to implement agreements and outline elements of an MSP Charter. This will provide a benchmark for partnerships, enabling those being developed to understand what the necessary quality standards are and to understand what is expected in terms of transparency, accountability, financial reporting, impact and governance.

    The book is essential reading for professionals and trainees engaging in multi-stakeholder processes for policy development and to implement agreements. It will also be useful for students of sustainable development, politics and international relations.


    Read more here


  • The Making of a Democratic Economy

    Wednesday, 31 July 2019

    Marjorie Kelly’s new book The Making of a Democratic Economy was released earlier this month. Co-authored with Ted Howard, the book is a clarion call for a movement ready to get serious about transforming our economic system. Illuminating the principles of a democratic economy through the stories of on-the-ground community wealth builders and their unlikely accomplices in the halls of institutional power, this book is a must read for everyone concerned with how we win the fight for an economy that’s equitable, not extractive.

    Order a copy here: https://www.ademocraticeconomy.org/


  • What We Have Instead: Poems by Gus Speth

    Friday, 31 May 2019

    ·         The collection of poetry What We Have Instead: Poems by Gus Speth was published earlier this month. After award-winning books on environment and scores of articles, this is his first book of poetry. In it there are stories about people and their journeys, scathing but sometimes humorous commentary on current events, several reflections on climate risks and environmental loss and where that leaves us, and many other poems—philosophical, funny, or something else. You can order a copy here: https://www.amazon.com/What-We-Have-Instead-Poems.


  • Reporting that Seeks to Empower

    Marilyn Smith

    In just 3 minutes, you can support GTN member Marilyn Smith and her multimedia project investigating energy poverty! The Energy Action Project (EnAct) believes its time for everyone to ‘get’ energy. That means ensuring universal access to sustainable energy services and also boosting understanding of how human demand for energy drives everything from production to prices to policies. EnAct uses documentary films to make the connection between people and energy, then embeds films in diverse content to investigate the causes, impacts and solutions to energy poverty. All content is jointly developed by experts and journalists and a stellar creative team.

    EnAct is competition for funding from La Fabrique AVIVA – a French programme to support social innovation – and needs votes to advance to the final round for funding.


    The deadline is is noon on Monday, 3 June – Paris time. So please get your votes in by Sunday.

    The voting site is in French, so here’s a link to English instructions: http://www.coldathome.today/voting-for-enact-on-aviva

    A big thanks in advance from Marilyn and her team! 


  • The Fate of Global Corporations in an Anti-Globalist World

    Allen White's "The Fate of Global Corporations in an Anti-Globalist World," originally published by Green Biz, was recently translated into Spanish by Jus Semper (translated essay available here). In the essay, White argues that the confluence of dislocation and despair among millions of workers and families portends a period of uncertainty in trade relations, immigration and the transnational flow of technology, talent and capital.  Progressive climate, worker and investor strategies can help neutralize anti-globalist sentiment while strengthening reputation and resilience of the multinational enterprises.



  • Postdevelopment in Practice: Alternatives, Economies, Ontologies

    Postdevelopment in Practice critically engages with recent trends in postdevelopment and critical development studies that have destabilised the concept of development, challenging its assumptions and exposing areas where it has failed in its objectives, whilst also pushing beyond theory to uncover alternatives in practice.

    This book reflects a rich and diverse range of experience in postdevelopment work, bringing together emerging and established contributors from across Latin America, South Asia, Europe, Australia and elsewhere, and it brings to light the multiple and innovative examples of postdevelopment practice already underway. The complexity of postdevelopment alternatives are revealed throughout the chapters, encompassing research on economy and care, art and design, pluriversality and buen vivir, the state and social movements, among others. Drawing on feminisms and political economy, postcolonial theory and critical design studies, the ‘diverse economies’ and ‘world of the third’ approaches and discussions on ontology and interdisciplinary fields such as science and technology studies, the chapters reveal how the practice of postdevelopment is already being carried out by actors in and out of development.

    The book features essays by GTN members Arturo Escobar, Gustavo Esteva, Miriam Lang, Ashish Kothari, Ariel Salleh, Federico Demaria, and Alberto Acosta.

    Read more here.


  • Interview with Gus Speth in Yes! Magazine

    In the case Juliana vs. the United States, 21 young people brought a suit against the US government for promoting the fossil fuel industry despite being well aware of the dangers of climate change. Since the case was filed in 2015, the US government has tried repeatedly to block it from having its day in court.

    One of the experts with whom the youths have consulted is Gus Speth, an Associate Fellow at Tellus and member of the Great Transition Network (among many other things in his illustrious career). He discusses the case and the history of inaction on climate change from presidents over the past 40 years in an enlightening interview with Yes! Magazine.

    Despite the obstacles ahead, Speth makes clear tha the fight is far from over:

    Thousands and thousands of the smartest people in our country have pushed hard for 40 years, and to see so little actually accomplished is disturbing. We’re up against the huge power of the fossil fuel industry; the extraordinary ideological opposition to the federal government doing anything important; money going into disinformation campaigns that people readily bought into. And it’s still going on.

    It is a sure sign in my view that we need to change the system of political economy in which we are struggling. It’s sobering, as I say. But not discouraging, because we’re still fighting.

    You can read the full interview here.


  • New Book by Timothy Wise: Eating Tomorrow

    Please find the following announcement of a new book by GTN member Timoty Wise.

    Eating Tomorrow: Agribusiness, Family Farmers, and the Battle for the Future of Food

    By Timothy A. Wise (New Press, 2019)


    Few challenges are more daunting than feeding a global population projected to reach 9.7 billion in 2050—at a time when climate change is making it increasingly difficult to grow crops successfully. In response, corporate and philanthropic leaders have called for major investments in industrial agriculture, including genetically modified seed technologies. Reporting from Africa, Mexico, India, and the United States, Timothy A. Wise’s Eating Tomorrow discovers how in country after country agribusiness and its well-heeled philanthropic promoters have hijacked food policies to feed corporate interests.​

    “There is no we who feed the world. The world is mainly fed by hundreds of millions of small-scale farmers who grow 70 percent of developing countries’ food." —from Eating Tomorrow

    ​With his unique background in academic research, international development, and economic journalism, Wise takes readers far and wide in his quest to understand how governments, development agencies, and farmers themselves have responded to the challenge to help developing countries grow more of their own food by empowering their small-scale farmers.

    ​Wise talks to victims of land-grabbing in Mozambique, Monsanto officials trying to push genetically modified corn into Mexico, and Malawian farmers trying to preserve and promote their nutritious native seeds. Wise reports on the damage done to Mexican rural communities by the North American Free Trade Agreement and exposes the hypocrisy of U.S. officials using arcane World Trade Organization rules to curtail India’s ambitious national food security plan. He reports from Iowa, where biofuels and factory farms absorb industrial agriculture’s surpluses and the rivers flow with toxic runoff.​

    Wise reminds readers that we already grow enough food to feed 10 billion. The true path to eating tomorrow is alongside today’s resource-starved farmers, who can and will feed the hungry – if we let them.


  • Second Edition of "Manging without Growth" Released

    The second edition of long-time GTN member Peter Victor's Managing without Growth: Slower by Design, not Disaster was recently released. The book explains why continued economic growth is no longer possible and, in advanced industrial countries, no longer desirable.

    You can learn more and order a copy at https://www.pvictor.com/. There is a substantial publisher's discount available through March 30.


  • Civic Charter Launched by International Civil Society Centre

    Thursday, 01 December 2016

    The Civic Charter, an initiative led by the International Civil Society Centre, was oficially launched at Global Perspectives 2016 in Berlin (Germany) on October 26. Developed through international consultations, it presents an opportunity to align efforts and develop new action initiatives to protect and expand civic space.

    The preamable of the Charter reads:

    We, the people have the right and the duty to participate in shaping our societies

    Human rights and fundamental freedoms are increasingly violated worldwide. In a growing number of countries, people and their organisations face severe restrictions and are deprived of their rights to participate in shaping their societies. Activists are threatened, persecuted, imprisoned, tortured and killed. Legitimate civil society organisations are hindered in their work, deprived of funding, forbidden to operate and dissolved. Avenues for people’s participation in public decision-making are restricted or closed down.

    Yet, unless people genuinely participate, the world will be unable to overcome its most threatening challenges, including persistent poverty, growing inequality, and climate change.

    People’s individual and collective participation brings life and gives meaning to democracy. It is vital in protecting human rights, achieving development and building just, tolerant and peaceful societies. It ensures that those who hold public offices, or other positions of power, are held accountable for their actions, and working for the common good.

    We reject any attempt to prevent people from participating in shaping their communities, their countries and our common planet.


    The Civic Charter provides a framework for people’s participation


    The Civic Charter is grounded in our common humanity and universally accepted freedoms and principles. It provides a framework for people’s participation that identifies their rights within existing international law and agreements.

    It is imperative that all governments, all levels of public administration, international institutions, business and civil society organisations worldwide fully respect and implement the provisions of this Charter.

    You can read the rest of the Charter along with the list of signatories (including a number of GTN members) here.


  • Designing for Hope

    GTN member Chrisna du Plessis, Associate Profesoor at the University of Pretoria, published Desiging for Hope - Pathways to Regenerative Sustainability. Co-authored with Dr Dominique Hes of the University of Melbourne, the book offers a hopeful response to the often frightening changes and challenges we face; arguing that we can actively create a positive and abundant future through mindful, contributive engagement that is rooted in a living systems based worldview. Concepts and practices such as Regenerative Development, Biophilic Design, Biomimicry, Permaculture and Positive Development are explored through interviews and over 30 case studies from the built environment to try and answer questions such as: ‘How can projects focus on creating a positive ecological footprint and contribute to community?’; How can we as practitioners restore and enrich the relationships in our projects?; and ‘How does design focus hope and create a positive legacy?’ The intention is to provide an inspiration to all kinds of designers and anyone working in the built environment, whether they are designing spaces and places, systems and processes, or simply new ways of being in the world so that they can find their own way of contributing to the creation of a thriving future.

    The duo also produced a documentary from the interviews of this book, called The Regenerates.


  • Taking Back What We Already Own: A Forum on Social Ownership

    A Forum on Social Ownership: This forum features Marjorie Kelly, Senior Fellow, The Democracy Collaborative and author of Owning our Future: The Emerging Ownership Revolution and The Divine Right of Capital with Nancy Goldner, Co-Chair, Hub Public Bank and Julie Matthaei, Co-Coordinator of Boston Area Solidarity Economy Network (BASEN).

    Sponsored by Hub Public Banking, BASEN, Boston Chapter, Democratic Socialists of America, the Democracy Collaborative, Massachusetts Global Action, Alliance for Democracy

     

    Where: encuentro 5, 9A Hamilton Place, Boston, MA 02108-4701

    When: Friday, September 25, 2015, 6:30 - 9:00 pm


  • 2016 SCORAI Conference: “Transitions Beyond a Consumer Society”

    The Sustainable Consumption Research and Action Initiative is organizing its second international conference on June 15–17, 2016 at the University of Maine located in Orono, Maine, USA. The conference theme is “Transitions Beyond the Consumer Society” and is intended to provide opportunities to consider: 

    1. The continued development of a network for the interdisciplinary and international exchange of ideas, research, and best practices related to sustainable consumption practice and policy.

    2. The presentation of innovative research and applied projects which improve our understanding of consumerist lifestyles and/or provide original insights into processes of societal transitions in the context of ecological limits, unequal distribution, and economic globalization.

    3. The generation of collective insights into key strategies, policies, and institutions designed to foster alternative means to pursue individual and societal well-being.

     

    Read more about the conference and how to get involved here.


  • GTN Authors Featured in Spanda Journal Issue on Systemic Change

    The July issue of the Spanda Journal, the international journal of the Spanda Foundation, guest edited by Helene Finidori, focuses on the question of systemic change and features a number of authors from the Great Transition Network.


    In her introduction, Helene Finidori explains the question that was sent to all writers:

    “How and why does systemic change manifest? How does it unfold? What are leverage points, the forces and dynamics at play? What are the conditions for its empowerment and enablement? How do agency and structure come into the picture? We would like to look at the subject from various perspectives and disciplines, in research and praxis, exploring the visible and invisible, space and time, unity and diversity, level and scale, movement and rhythm.”

    In addition to Finidori, the GTN members featured are Rasigan Maharajh, Michelle Holliday, Mimi Stokes-Katzenbach, Jack Harich, and Ashwani Vasishti.

     


  • New Article by Rich Rosen on IAM Research and Climate Policy in "Technological Forecasting and Social Change"

    The July 2015 issue of Technological Forecastign and Social Change will feature an article by Tellus Institute Senior Fellow Rich Rosen that critically reviews the integrated assessment modeling (IAM) research underlying the AMPERE study.


    You can read the abstract below and the full article here.

    This critical review of the integrated assessment modeling (IAM) research underlying the AMPERE study is also relevant to many other IAM-based model comparison papers. One of the main symptoms of the serious methodological problems of these studies is that the results produced by different models for what are portrayed as the “same” scenarios differ quite substantially from each other. While the authors of the AMPERE study correctly raise the important question of whether these differences are due primarily to differences in model structures, or to differences in the sets of input assumptions for the “same” scenario used by different research teams, they never address this question in a logically systematic and credible way. In fact, they cannot and do not arrive at an answer, since each modeling team generally relies on a single but different set of most input assumptions for the same scenario. Finally, the research teams involved in the AMPERE project, and other similar projects, fail to understand the fundamental impossibility of forecasting net mitigation costs or benefits over the long run given both the practical and deep uncertainties implicit in both the equations comprising these IAMs, and the input assumptions on which they rely.


  • GTN Members Contribute to the Eugene Memorandum: "The role of cities in advancing sustainable consumption"

    The participants of the workshop The Role of Cities in Advancing Sustainable Consumption in Eugene in Eugen, Oregon, from October 29–November 1, 2014 (co-sponsored by the Urban Sustainability Directors Network and the Sustainable Consumption Research and Action Initiative) produced a memorandum calling on cities to take the lead in advancing sustainable consumption.

    The memorandum begins,

    Cities in North America have an important role to play in building prosperity and well-being while promoting lifestyles compatible with the limits of natural systems. The consumption of materials and energy in high-income cities is a significant factor in driving climate change and resource depletion. Increasingly, government agencies, industry organizations, and experts in the research community are calling attention to the need both to consume less and consume differently. Cities can and should take action to make this possible.


    It goes on to outline 10 guiding principles for local action.

    You can read it in full on the Sustainability: Science, Practice & Policy website.


  • GTN Members Keynoting Conferences this Summer

    Anders Wijkman, Vice President of the Club of Rome, will be a keynote speaker at the World Conference of Futures Research 2015 conference "Futures Studies Tackling Wicked Problems: Where Futures Research, Education and Action Meet" in Turku, Finland, June 11-12, 2015.

    Karen O'Brien, professor at the University of Oslo, and Nebosja Nakicenovic, Deputy Director and Deputy CEO of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, will be keynote speakers at the International Scientific Conference "Our Common Future under Climate Change" in Paris July 7-10, 2015.

    Melissa Leach, Director of the Institute of Development Studies; Giorgos Kallis, professor at the Autonomous University of Barcelona; Inge Ropke, professor at Aalborg University; and Kate Raworth, visiting research associate and lecturer at Oxford University's Environmental Change Institute, will be keynote speakers at the European Society for Ecological Economics 2015 conference "Transformations" at the University of Leeds, June 30-July 3, 2015.

     

     

     


  • Nature Climate Change Publishes Letter to the Editor from Tellus Senior Fellow Rich Rosen

    Tellus Senior Fellow Rich Rosen has a letter to the editor in the latest edition of Nature Climate Change on the peer review process for integrated assessment models (IAMs). The letter concludes, "In 2013, the IAM Consortium — which was set up at the request of the IPCC after the Fourth Assessment Report and of which I am a member — set up scientific working groups intending to establish communitywide standards on IAM documentation and
    the inclusion of key input assumptions in research publications. There has been little
    or no progress since. It is my contention that this situation should be rectified, so as
    to usher in a new era for peer reviews in this field.

  • Burkhard Gnärig Releases New Book on CSO Disruption

    Burkhard Gnärig (who gave an interview to GTI last year) just released his new book The Hedgehog and the Beetle – Disruption and Innovation in the Civil Society Sector. The book reviews the future prospects of our sector and claims, that in order to survive and thrive civil society organisations need to re-invent themselves.

    You can read and comment on the book here: http://disrupt-and-innovate.org/book/start/. You can also order it as a paperback or e-book on www.lulu.com.

    You can participate in the disucssions around the book on Twitter or on the new website www.disrupt-and-innovate.org.


  • "Strategies Towards the New Sustaianbility Paradigm": A New Book about the GT

    A new book, "Strategies Towards the New Sustainability Paradigm," edited by Odile Schwarz-Herion and Abdelnaser Omran, traces out paths toward a GT future.

    On a historical global turning point, this book offers a thorough exploration of the “New Sustainability Paradigm”, originally developed by the Global Scenario Group (GSG) of the Stockholm Environmental Institute (SEI) as a starting point for analyzing real-life transitions and transformations. 11 contributors from 5 continents present detailed analyses of economic and political transitions in Western and Eastern Europe, the USA, the Middle East, and in Asia, discussing the role of different players in the implementation of the New Sustainability Paradigm.

    Part I offers an overview of the six scenarios developed by the GSG and a short discussion of significant papers published by the Great Transition Initiative (GTI) of the Tellus Institute. Next come examples of dramatic historical and current transitions in Western Europe, the USA, Eastern Europe, the Middle East (Arabian Spring), and Asia, as well as an analysis of the potential of humankind to manage a great transition to the new sustainability paradigm. Subsequent chapters highlight the role of culture and education and review the role of different players for the implementation of the new sustainability paradigm. The focus of Part II is on the ecological pillar of Sustainability. The discussion includes urgent ecological problems including climate engineering, eco-criminality, bioterrorism, biodiversity protection, water, energy, and food security. Part III deals with needed innovations in sustainable waste management and sustainable city architecture, especially big cities in developing and threshold countries, where a significant part of the world population is concentrated. The fourth and final section offers an analysis of insights developed throughout the book, and outlines recommendations for the implementation of the New Sustainability Paradigm by civil society, grass-root movements, scholars, politically neutral NGOs, sincere media players, and by open-minded and enlightened politicians to manage and steer the Great Transition towards sustainable global democracy.